Empowered To Connect

Posts by Kayla North

The “Yes” Jar

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Monday, October 24, 2016

Would you love to have a simple parenting tool you can start implementing right away that will help you build trust with your kids? There is one simple word that can make a huge difference… “YES!” An easy way to begin giving our kids more yes’s is to make a “Yes” jar. Once you fill [...]

Family Nurture Groups

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Wednesday, August 3, 2016

We strive to connect with our kids as we teach them new skills.  Before we can take away a survival skill, we need to replace it with a new one. One of the things we often suggest to families is for them to do family nurture group in their home. Here’s how you can get [...]

The “Yes” Jar

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Friday, April 8, 2016

Would you love to have a simple parenting tool you can start implementing right away that will help you build trust with your kids? There is one simple word that can make a huge difference… “YES!” An easy way to begin giving our kids more yes’s is to make a Yes Jar. Here’s what you [...]

Lazy Parenting

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Saturday, March 28, 2015

I don’t consider myself a lazy person.  I am up early, I rarely sit down, and I always have a to-do list a mile long. I mean who has time to be lazy when you are a parent?  Yet I find myself parenting lazy.  I find myself saying ‘no’ to my kids out of laziness.  I [...]

Band-Aids Heal More Than You Can See

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Monday, April 28, 2014

Giving and receiving love may seem like an easy thing, but for many adopted and foster kids it is hard. They have given love to people only to have those people disappear from their lives or not return their love. They have received love only to be moved to a new home, or the “love” they received was not love at all.

These kids are confused about what it means to give and receive love.

May I Have a Compromise?

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Friday, January 31, 2014

When people hear our kids ask, “May I have a compromise?” they tend to look at us a bit funny. They seem completely confused when we respond to our kids as if their request for a compromise is normal. But at our house it is normal. In fact, it’s a request we hear no less than a dozen times each day.

We began teaching our kids to ask for compromises when our now five-year old daughter was only two. We figured that she was old enough to have a conversation with us, so she was old enough to begin learning how to compromise.

One thing we’ve noticed over the years among kids who are adopted or in foster care is that they tend to have control issues — sometimes really BIG control issues. Many kids (and parents) struggle with control issues, but this especially true for adopted and foster kids that come from homes or situations where most, if not all, of their world was out of control.